Sports

The Best Baseball Players of All Time

The most famous sport in America, baseball, witnessed the unmatched skills of a lot of legends over time. From the iconic home run of Babe Ruth in the 1932 World Series to a superhero-like catch by Willie Mays in the 1954 World Series, there are many iconic moments to remember and tons of admirable players that made their way to the hall of fame. Like any other sport, there is also a never-ending debate on deciding the top players of baseball. Nonetheless, we tried our best to list the top 10 best baseball players of all time. dumpor

1. Babe Ruth

Expecting anyone else to be the number one in the game except the king? You better not! Starting his career with the Boston Red Sox in 1914, Ruth broke the record of most home runs by Ned Williamson and belted 29 in 1919. He broke his own record in the following year, with 54 home runs, when no one else managed to reach 20.

From 1918 to 1931, the king amazingly smacked 692 balls, while no other player hit 300. From 1916 to 1917, before becoming a full-time outfielder, Ruth tossed 650 innings and earned 47 wins and a 1.88 ERA. slbux

2. Willie Mays

The greatest center fielder and a legendary all-rounder, Willie Mays, molded elite power, contact, and defense. With 660 home runs, 3283 hits, and 1903 runs batted in, F95forum Mays delivered 156 OPS+ (on-base plus slugging), and. 302 average. He was awarded 12 consecutive Gold Glove Awards, for his outstanding performance in the outfield.

The most iconic moment in the career of the two-time MVP was his over-the-shoulder catch in the eighth inning of a tied 1954 World Series, which helped the New York Giants win that competition, and eventually, the championship.

3. Barry Bonds

Barry was a phenomenal hitter. The Giant’s top player holds the record for his total of 762 career home runs, a single season record of scoring 73 home runs in 2001, and most career walks. His outstanding defense made him the winner of 8 Golden Glove Awards, and the only player to rack up 500 stolen bases and 500 home runs.

The 7 times NL MVP (National League Most Valuable Player) winner also holds a record for most Silver Slugger Awards. Bonds became MLB’s (Major League Baseball) all-time home run leader when he clobbered a fastball from Nationals left-hander Mike Bacsik, to right center field for his 765th career home run and successfully broke Hank Aaron’s 33year old record.

4. Ken Griffey Jr.

George Kenneth Griffey, nicknamed Junior, played for 22 years in MLB and spent most of his career with Cincinnati Reds and Mariners. With the seventh most home runs (630) in MLB history, Griffey was also an exceptional defender and ten-time Gold Glove winner. His most iconic moments on the field were when,

  1. In 1990 at Yankee Stadium, he went over the wall to rob Jesse Barfield and then celebrated his victory with his trademark smile and an exciting sprint back to the dugout.
  2. On May 26, 1995, he helped Randy Johnson with an outstanding catch on a deep drive by Kevin Bass, shattered his right wrist in the process, and ended up missing 73 games. However, the legend returned in no time and lead the Mariners on their playoff run, as they got over a 13 ½ game deficit to catch the Angels and win the AL West.

5. Ted Williams

The magnificent hitter of MLB, Ted Williams, has the highest on-base percentage of 0.482. His name is among the 20, in total home runs, runs scored, runs batted in, and walks, despite missing his full five prime seasons to military service. This amazing splinter, with his uncanny eye, posted the last major league season with a 0.400 batting average. He led the AL in slugging percentage 9 times and batting average 6 times, in his 19-year career.

6. Hank Aaron

As a tremendous power hitter, Hank Aaron was crowned Home Run King for a generation. A total of 755 home runs, 6,856 total bases, and 2,297 runs batted in, are indicative of his unmatched skill. He had a batting average of 0.305. Additionally,

  • Aaron won three Gold Gloves for his outfield play.
  • He was selected for the All-Star Game for straight 21 years, with at least 30 home runs in 15 seasons.

The legend finished his career in 1976, mywikinews with the then second most hits (3,771) and runs scored (2,174) in MLB’s history.

7. Ichiro Suzuki

Ichiro was a Japanese professional baseball outfielder, who played for 28 years. He was the first MLB player to enter the Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame. For his three-hit performance that also included the event’s first ever inside-the-park home run, Ichiro won the 2007 All-Star Game MVP Award. He had seven hitting streaks of 20 or more games.

Being a Japanese, Suzuki endorsed a lot of Japanese brands, and always wore gloves, that were personally crafted by the master Nobuyoshi Tsubota. As he rose to fame, people also came to know about the greatness of Japanese baseball glove manufacturers!

8. Walter Johnson

Walter Johnson was a dominant pitcher for decades. He led the AL more often and topped the league 12 times in his 21-year career. These are the highlights of his career,

  • In 1913, Johnson won 36 games, with a whopping 0.78 WHIP ttactics (walks and hits per inning pitched, whip count below 1 is considered outstanding), and won the Chalmers Award.
  • In 1924, he took a second MVP, as he led the Senators to their first World Series.
  • Johnson’s 3,509 career strikeouts were a record for 56 years, and with his win total of 417, he’s only second to Cy Young’s 511.

9. Stan Musial

Musial was an American baseball outfielder, who played for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1941 to 1944, and from 1946 to 1963. The legend led his team to three World Series titles (1942, 1944, and 1946), and also racked up the MVP awards in 1943, 1946, and 1948.

With a 0.331 batting average, Musial’s highest single-season strikeout total was 46, in 505 plate appearances. As a 41-year-old, he still managed to hit 0.330 and opponents often gave up on his unmatched talent. In the words of the pitcher Carl Erskine, “I’ve had pretty success with Stan by throwing him my best pitch and backing up third.”

Musial played all his games with Cardinal’s franchise, including the uniform, and let us tell you that contrary to the popular belief, baseball uniforms are not made of cotton.

10. Honus Wagner

Honus Wagner, nicknamed “The Flying Dutchman”, played 21 seasons in MLB, from 1897 to 1917. As one of the greatest shortstops ever, the iconic moments in Wagner’s career are as follows,

  • In 1909, Wagner stole his way around the bases in 1st inning against Cubs.
  • In 1915, he hit a grand slam HR at the age of 41.
  • At the time of his retirement, Wagner tallied the second most hits (3,420), runs batted in (1,732), and doubles (643) in major-league history.

Summing It Up,

These baseball legends have made the game what it is today, i.e. everyone’s number one sport choice. A lot of players rose to the hall of fame, while some got lost in history. Today’s baseball players might have some difficulty being up to par with legends like Babe Ruth or Willie Mays, but we wish them all the best and maybe they can make it to our next updated list!

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